(Reblogged from adiemtocarpe)
(Reblogged from sciencehastheanswers)
(Reblogged from suckmyrichardgrayson)

billzb93:

Few pics from my even walk today, Kal was not playing ball for the camera

(Reblogged from billzb93)

novvaik:

My Dog is adorably terrifying.

Cute little soul-stealer.

(Reblogged from novvaik)
(Reblogged from mofta7elro7)
(Reblogged from ihaveasadnessshield)
sorrygirlsisuckcock:

http://sorrygirlsisuckcock.tumblr.com/

"How to get straight guys to unfollow you with one post."

sorrygirlsisuckcock:

http://sorrygirlsisuckcock.tumblr.com/

"How to get straight guys to unfollow you with one post."

(Source: 2sthboiz)

(Reblogged from sorrygirlsisuckcock)

jjrodriguezv:

#NoamChomsky #Education #Debt

(Reblogged from jjrodriguezv)

ofinsects:

7ns:

64memories:

uwaah:

yaoiguai:

boys meowing soulfully

praise our cat lord amen

playing this at my funeral

FUCK ME SOFTLY WITH A CHAINSAW

oh sweet jesus christ on a fucking cracker

(Reblogged from kawaii-fokkusu)
(Reblogged from playinwithmatches)
(Reblogged from edrockbells)

For years, I opened my 11th-grade U.S. history classes by asking students, “What’s the name of that guy they say discovered America?” A few students might object to the word “discover,” but they all knew the fellow I was talking about. “Christopher Columbus!” several called out in unison.

“Right. So who did he find when he came here?” I asked. Usually, a few students would say, “Indians,” but I asked them to be specific: “Which nationality? What are their names?”

Silence.

In more than 30 years of teaching U.S. history and guest-teaching in others’ classes, I’ve never had a single student say, “Taínos.” How do we explain that? We all know the name of the man who came here from Europe, but none of us knows the name of the people who were here first—and there were hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of them. Why haven’t you heard of them?

This ignorance is an artifact of historical silencing—rendering invisible the lives and stories of entire peoples.

[…] In an interview with Barbara Miner, included in Rethinking Columbus, Suzan Shown Harjo of the Morning Star Institute, who is Creek and Cheyenne, said: “As Native American peoples in this red quarter of Mother Earth, we have no reason to celebrate an invasion that caused the demise of so many of our people, and is still causing destruction today.” After all, Columbus did not merely “discover,” he took over. He kidnapped Taínos, enslaved them—“Let us in the name of the Holy Trinity go on sending all the slaves that can be sold,” Columbus wrote—and “punished” them by ordering that their hands be cut off or that they be chased down by vicious attack dogs, if they failed to deliver the quota of gold that Columbus demanded. One eyewitness accompanying Columbus wrote that it “did them great damage, for a dog is the equal of 10 men against the Indians.”

Corporate textbooks and children’s biographies of Columbus included none of this and were filled with misinformation and distortion. But the deeper problem was the subtext of the Columbus story: it’s OK for big nations to bully small nations, for white people to dominate people of color, to celebrate the colonialists with no attention paid to the perspectives of the colonized, to view history solely from the standpoint of the winners.

(Reblogged from fariyah)
dlubes:

bae caught me slippin

dlubes:

bae caught me slippin

(Reblogged from thrash--wang)


~ There is HOPE in this life
There is FEAR in these eyes
I BELIEVE we can fly
Through the hole in the SKY~

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